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Old 10-29-2017, 06:47 AM   #11
alantf
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Don't talk to me about cam chains !!!!!! Last week Jan's daughter's Renault was in for repair, so she borrowed our Citroen c3. It's 14 years old, but it's only done 122000 km (around 76000 miles) (small island) She was driving down the autopista (freeway?) when the timing belt decided to shatter. Luckily she managed to get across to the shoulder, and got the recovery to get her to the Citroen dealer. It's just cost me 975 (just over $1100) to get the engine rebuilt.
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Old 10-29-2017, 08:29 AM   #12
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Ouch.....Most cars with a timing belt recommend replacement at 100000 Km.....Most cars today are a close interference engine.....Meaning that if a belt breaks the valves hit the pistons & you have heavy damage.....There are a few that are not "Close interference" engines.......Dodge being one......Kia 2.4 have two timing belts on them that cost just about $750.00....I have a Honda civic that I just had replaced at 190000 Km.......Total cost.....$240.00
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Old 10-30-2017, 03:39 AM   #13
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I think what it boils down too is that it is considered a "Stepping stone" bike & will not be kept long or put a lot of miles on before "Upgrading".....Their bigger engines are a better design....The 1400 is Self adjusting valves & no design flaws & easily go 100000 with no problems........My fault...I never did enough research before I took ownership.......As I stated in the spring she will be sold/traded for something bigger more reliable design......I'm hoping I can find a M90 that I like.
Shame on Suzuki. It may be that a stepping stone bike will be a different brand of the same size. A lot of riders don't want or need a larger bike. A lot of folks can't afford to trade up to a costlier bike. Older folks on a fixed income will not be able to purchase new wheels to ride just to get something without factory warts built in during the design stage.
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Old 10-30-2017, 03:56 AM   #14
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Don't talk to me about cam chains !!!!!! Last week Jan's daughter's Renault was in for repair, so she borrowed our Citroen c3. It's 14 years old, but it's only done 122000 km (around 76000 miles) (small island) She was driving down the autopista (freeway?) when the timing belt decided to shatter. Luckily she managed to get across to the shoulder, and got the recovery to get her to the Citroen dealer. It's just cost me 975 (just over $1100) to get the engine rebuilt.
Oh my. Sounds like an age related failure. The belt just got too old to be flexible. Sort of like tires getting old and the rubber gets hard and cracks.
It is sad that a low km vehicle with 14 years on it is likely worth less than the repair. It is the same with my Ranger with a 4.0 liter v6. With only 80,000 km on it after 10 years an engine replacement or rebuild is worth more than the truck.
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:34 AM   #15
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Shame on Suzuki. It may be that a stepping stone bike will be a different brand of the same size. A lot of riders don't want or need a larger bike. A lot of folks can't afford to trade up to a costlier bike. Older folks on a fixed income will not be able to purchase new wheels to ride just to get something without factory warts built in during the design stage.
Your right WW.....I love the size & feel of the bike.....I just can't get past the design flaw.I'm getting older & at my weight (150 lbs) the bike fits me perfectly.
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Old 10-30-2017, 07:01 PM   #16
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Your right WW.....I love the size & feel of the bike.....I just can't get past the design flaw.I'm getting older & at my weight (150 lbs) the bike fits me perfectly.
You might want to check out and research what Kawasaki has to offer in the same size bike and displacement.
The c90 and m90 are a very nice bike and I actually looked at them closely a while back. They also need crash bars like the 50 series so you can drop them and roll them back up on 2 wheels with little effort. Enterprise makes a nice bar that does a great job of rolling the bike upright with old guy strength and effort. I tested the bars 2 times by accident while doing oil changes on Lynda's bike. I put the bars on the bike for Lynda and she never did drop it.
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